The Invisible War Zone: 5 Ways Children Of Narcissistic Parents Self-Destruct In Adulthood

“Adverse childhood experiences are the single greatest unaddressed public health menace facing our nation today .”- Dr. Robert Block, MD, former President of the American Academy of Pediatrics

God& Man

Much of society associates the terms “trauma” and “PTSD” with war veterans. Yet we forget about the children who grow up in war zone at home, who suffer psychological scarring at vulnerable developmental stages of “peoples lives”. Neglect, mistreatment, abandonment and/ or any form of sexual, emotional and physical abuse( such as the type imposed by toxic, narcissistic mothers) have been proven by research such as the Adverse Childhood Experiences survey to leave an impact the hell is destructive and long-lasting.

As trauma expert Bessel van Der Kolk, author of notes, our brains can literally be rewired for anxiety when it comes to childhood abuse. Study have confirmed that parental verbal aggressivenes has an impact on key areas of the brain related to learning, memory, decision-making and emotional regulation( Choi et. al, 2009; Teicher, 2009 ). Childhood trauma can affect our impulse control, increase our likelihood of substance abuse, shape the style we examine our environment for threats, and leaves us exposed to a plethora of health problems in adulthood( Bremner, 2006; Shin et. al, 2006 ).

According to researchers, early childhood trauma can affect our brains in the following terms 😛 TAGEND

Our amygdala, which controls our fight/ flight response, emotional regulation, and our moods, becomes hyperactive and enlarged as a result of trauma. We can become highly emotionally responsive and hypervigilant to potential threats in our environment due to trauma.

as a result of trauma. We can become exceedingly emotionally responsive and hypervigilant to potential threats in our environment due to trauma. Our hippocampus, the part of our brain that deals with learning and memory, shrinks. This attains incorporating traumatic memories a lot least effective. The traumatic impact of those memories remain a great deal more impactful .

.” This induces incorporating traumatic memories a lot less effective. The traumatic impact of those memories remain a great deal more impactful. Trauma can hinder the prefrontal cortex, the center of our executive functioning, decision making and judgment. This can affect our ability to regulate our emotional reactions as well as scheme, focus and coordinate.

Judith Lewis Herman,

Peter A. Levine,

Nina W. Brown,

Dr. Van der Kolk, Childhood Trauma Leads to Brains Wired for Fear