Molly Ringwald watched ‘The Breakfast Club’ with her daughter. Her thoughts were epic.

Molly Ringwald was basically the face of my adolescent years.

I was 10 years old when “The Breakfast Club” came out, and by the time I graduated from high school, I’d probably seen the cinema a dozen hours.

“Pretty in Pink” are members of my go-to sleepover flicks with my girlfriends, to the point that we wore out our VHS copy of it( here’s an explainer about VHS, for you young’uns ).

John Hughes’ films served as both a mirror and a map of the turbulent teen years for my generation. Many of us watched ourselves in his quirky, awkward characters and appreciated teen life being portrayed at least somewhat realistically.

But 30 -something years later, as a full-on adult, the mother of two adolescent girls, and a human being in the age of #MeToo, I’m starting to view those movies through a different lens.

As it turns out, i used Molly Ringwald . She shared her guess on her roles in iconic ‘8 0s movies in an essay published in the New Yorker, and it was epic.

After Ringwald watched “The Breakfast Club” with her tween daughter, she couldn’t get the sexual harassment scenes out of her head .

In the cinema, Ringwald plays the role of Claire, the popular daughter. In her essay, she opens up about how a scene where Judd Nelson’s character, Bender, conceals under Claire’s desk and seems under her skirt — and then presumably touches her inappropriately.

She also shared how some scenes from her other Hughes movies now strike her as “troubling”:

“There is still so much that I love in their own homes, but lately I have felt the need to examine the role that these movies have played in our culture life: where they came from, and what they might mean now. When my daughter proposed watching “The Breakfast Club” together, I had hesitated , not knowing how she would react: if she would understand the cinema or if she would even like it. I worried that she would find aspects of it troubling, but I hadn’t anticipated that it would ultimately be most troubling to me.”

As an example from “Sixteen Candles, ” Ringwald points out how “the dreamboat, Jake, basically trades his drunk girlfriend, Caroline, to the Geek, to satisfy the latter’s sexual urges, in return for Samantha’s underwear.”

Yeah. Eek.

In the age of # MeToo, many of Hughes’ storylines come across as normalizing unhealthy sex dynamics at best and condoning flat-out misogyny at worst.

Perhaps Hughes was simply a product of his time. But that doesn’t build his cinemas immune to scrutiny .

As Ringwald points out, one of the major issues with Bender and Claire’s storyline in “The Breakfast Club” is that Bender basically verbally abuses Claire throughout the film, calling her names, yelling at her, intimidating her — in addition to sexually harassing her.

And yet, in the end, he still gets the girl.

What message does that convey to young audiences? That depends on who you ask, but reading through Ringwald’s essay, Hughes appears to have had quite a history of misogynistic expression — far deeper and darker than the teen movie scenes we’re talking about and far more than what we might expect for a “product of his time.”

“It’s hard for me to understand how John was able to write with so much sensitivity, ” Ringwald wrote, “and also have such a glaring blind spot.”

I suppose she was being kind. Severely, if you’re feeling protective of your favorite teen cinema or defensive on Hughes’ behalf, read her essay in full. It’s an eye-opener.

Ringwald’s mixed feelings about her movies reflect the tension we all feel when we realize things we love are also problematic.

“I’m not thinking about the man right now but of the cinemas that he left behind, ” Ringwald wrote. “Films that I am proud of in so many ways. Films that, like his earlier writing, though to a much lesser extent, could also be considered racist, misogynistic, and, from time to time, homophobic.”

“The Breakfast Club” actors Antony Michael Hall, Ally Sheedy, Molly Ringwald, and Paul Gleason accepting a Silver Bucket of Excellence Award at the 2005 MTV Movie Awards. Photo by Kevin Winter/ Getty Images.

In the simplistic narrations that define our age, that last sentence alone might be enough for many to abandon Hughes’ cinemas altogether.

But, as Ringwald points out, it’s not that simple. She has heard from countless fans over the years that Hughes’ films helped them feel less alone as teens. She shared a tale of a black, gay human who told her that “The Breakfast Club” saved their own lives. He said the cinema proved him “that there were other people like me who were struggling with their identities.”

As much as we might want to make it so, this is not an easily defined issue.

Ultimately, Molly Ringwald reminds us that our views on art and culture should be ever-evolving .

It’s easy to brush off “troubling” elements of music, movie, art, and other creative works as products of their hour. But we need to remain aware of how ongoing pleasure of such works affects our culture as well as our subconscious.

Molly Ringwald and Ally Sheedy at “The Breakfast Club” 30 th Anniversary Restoration at SXSW in 2015. Photo by Michael Buckner/ Getty Images.

Toxic notions about girls, race, sexuality, and other identity elements are always toxic, even if we don’t recognize them as such at the time. And when we do acknowledge those things in hindsight, it’s important to give them the analysis they are due.

The good news is that we are recognizing and analyzing those things as a smarter and more sensitive society. That’s progress.

We can still enjoy a film like “The Breakfast Club” — we just need to be honest about its flaws. And I, for one, am really glad Molly Ringwald was the one to go there.

Make sure to visit: CapGeneration.com

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s